Are You a Bully? | Corona, CA

BystanderWhen we think about the typical bully, we think of the big, tough kid on the playground who pushes everyone around. Sure, but those aren’t the only types of bullies. The cheerleader, the class clown, even the quiet kid can be a bully. Bullies can be any size, age, gender or grade.

So, what does it mean to be a bully? When someone uses words or actions to hurt someone who has a hard time defending themselves. Sometimes kids who bully think that it’s cool, but what is cool about hurting someone? Name calling, tripping someone, laughing at them, leaving them out, ignoring them on purpose – how can hurting someone possibly be “no big deal?” If kids think about why they are bullying, they can then deal with those reasons and change their behavior. Not only will they feel better about themselves, but others will think so too.

Do you think you are a bully? Do you think you know someone who is? If you answer yes to any of these questions, you may want to rethink the way you treat others:

  • Do you hurt other kids on purpose?
  • Do you like to tease kids about how they look or act?
  • Are kids afraid of you?
  • Do you hit, threaten, or leave kids out?
  • Do you take or ruin other kids’ stuff?
  • Do you enjoy it when you upset other kids?
  • Do you blame others for your problems?
  • Do you say mean things about others, either in person or on social media?

If you would like to learn more about bullying and what you can do to prevent it, contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness at 866-459-7225 or visit www.simpleacts.org for additional information.

Cyber Bullying: The Complete Resource Guide | Riverside, CA

Zack W VanWe recently come across this amazing e-guide to cyber-bullying. We all know bullying is becoming more and more common these days, and cyber-bullying is the worst. Not only because a cyber bully believes he/she is safe behind the screen, but because they cannot see how their words can affect their target.

But what is cyber-bullying exactly? What makes it different from typical playground teasing amongst children? But most importantly, what kinds of things can we do to prevent it from becoming progressively worse? All of this is covered for you in one e-guide. For more information, read more:

http://backgroundchecks.org/cyber-bullying-helping-the-bullied-stopping-the-bullies.html

Thank you, Jenny Holt, for such an eloquent way of explaining what has become such a hurtful way to bring someone down, instead of lifting them up.

If you would like to learn more about cyber-bullying and what you can do to prevent it, contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness at 866-459-7225 or visit www.simpleacts.org for additional information.

4 Simple Solutions We All Can Do To Stop Bullying | Corona, CA

Kids in classBeginning to foster a culture of caring, respect, and awareness starts with a few simple steps that make the biggest change:

1. Increase Your Own Awareness

Realizing when bullying is taking place is a necessary first step in finding solutions. By understanding the scope and roots of the problem, you will get an idea of how to start proactively working to address bullying, including teasing, name-calling, shunning, and physical intimidation or assault. Does your school, sports club, or youth group create a culture of respect, caring, and safety for everyone? Are children appropriately supervised during recess periods, lunch and before and after school?  Do educators have adequate support and training for addressing bullying?

2. Respond Forceful and Respectfully

If you see bullying take place or hear about it, remember that your reactions provide a context for how the kids involved will respond to and interpret the situation. Kids need to see adults being powerful and respectful in responding to problems. If parents or teachers get upset and overreact, kids are more likely to get upset and might even avoid telling adults about future problems. Staying calm, respectful, and persistent will make you more effective in talking to administrators, educators youth group leaders, or parents about their response to a bullying problem. Not everybody reacts in a helpful way when first approached so be prepared to persist.

3. Teach Your Kids Protective Skills

Positive peer relationship skills help to prevent and stop bullying. Tell your children that they have the confidence and power to walk away from any situation. Making safe choices like stepping out of a line or changing seats is sometimes all that is needed to make a bullying problem stop. Ensure that your child is persistent in getting help and is prepared to continue to ask for help even if an adult does not respond immediately.

4. Become Involved

Know what other parents and adults in your community are doing to stop bullying. Insist that your child’s school has a mandatory district-wide anti-bullying policy and educates their staff on diffusing and recognizing all forms and types of youth bullying. Write to your county- and state-level officials telling them of the seriousness of bullying and demand they make it a top priority in their campaigns.

If you would like to learn more about bullying and what you can do to prevent it, contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness at 866-459-7225 or visit www.simpleacts.org for additional information regarding bullying.

National Bullying Prevention Month | Corona, CA


October marks National Bullying Prevention Month, this is a time that all of us to should together to combat, while also bringing awareness to bullying, harassment and cruelty. Of course one of the most important actions we can take is to be a part of the solution, and not the devastating problem that harms many children and even adults. There are many actions that you can take to keep yourself and your children safe from bullying.

If You’re Being Bullied:

  • Stick with friends, there is safety in numbers. Also, try to avoid being alone in targeted areas like locker rooms, restrooms, and places the bully tends to hang around.
  • You must be assertive, while also showing confidence when standing up for yourself. You can use body language to show the bully you aren’t afraid of them. One thing you can try is standing up straight and making eye contact. Shying away make bullies think you are more vulnerable.
  • Ignore the bully by walking away or by not responding to their insults at all. You can also try to get out of the situation by agreeing with the bullies comments. Say something along the lines of “Whatever” or “You’re Completely Right” then calmly walk away. Don’t let buddies get a rise out of you, that’s what they’re usually looking for.
  • Don’t seek revenge, by doing that, you would be making yourself a part of the problem rather than the solution. Also remember violence doesn’t solve any problem, it will only makes things worse.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help. If you’re being bullied, don’t keep it a secret. Ask your friends or an adult for help. Also report any bullies incidents to a teacher.

If Someone Is Being Bullied:

  • Don’t be a bystander while someone is being bullies, speak up for them. When no one speaks up, bullies tend to think they can get away with their terrible and harmful actions.
  • You must refuse to join in the act of bullying, and refuse to even watch someone being bullied. It’s not right to stand around while someone is being bullied, you never know what that someone may be going through.
  • Speak up for victims that are bullies are attacking.  You can try to tell the bully to stop harassing and being rude to the victim. It’s best to do this with a group of friends, as is mentioned before, there is safety in numbers.
  • Give support by talking to the person being bullied in private; extend your friendship and listening ear. Making an effort to include others that aren’t typically included can help someone greatly.
  • You should report any bullying you see to teachers or another adult. They can set clear, nonviolent consequences for the bully’s behavior, thus preventing the bullying from continuing.
  • You can think about way to help others being bullied and share those ideas with fellow classmates or teachers. There’s a good chance that not all adults know what’s going on our schools on a daily basis. Talk to a parent, teacher or counselor and see what they have to add to your ideas.

Our program’s here at West Coast Fundraising have focused on helping children understand what to do if they are being bullied or witness someone else being bullied. We must put a stop to this epidemic, starting with our elementary schools. For information regarding our programs here at Simple Acts of Care and Kindness, contact 866-459-7225 or visit our website at www.simpleacts.org. Let’s take a stand and put an end to bullying!

National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month 2016

September marks National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, which is a time to help promote resources and awareness around the issues of suicide prevention, how you can help others and how to talk to someone about suicide without increasing the risk of self-harm.

Mental illness and thoughts of suicide does not discriminate. It can affect anyone regardless of their age, background or gender. Suicide is the second leading cause of among young people and is often times the result of a mental illness that attacks people when most vulnerable. According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) more that 41,000 Americans take their own lives and more than 494,000 Americans have received medical care for self-harm. These numbers are staggering and suicide should not be considered common. Suicide is preventable – know the warning signs and you may be able to save a life.

What are the warning sign for suicide?

  • Threats or comments about taking their life, also known as social ideation, can begin with seemingly harmless thoughts such as “I wish I wasn’t on this earth anymore”, but can become more dangerous
  • Increased use of alcohol and drug use
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Social withdrawal from friends, family and the community
  • Dramatic, over-the-top mood swings
  • Talking, writing or thoughts about death
  • Impulsive and reckless behavior

Behavior that should be taken into consideration

Anyone that is exhibiting these behaviors should seek professional help immediately:

  • Putting their affairs in order and giving away possessions
  • Saying goodbye to family and friends
  • Mood shifts from manic to calm
  • Looking around to buy, steal or borrow the tools they need to commit suicide, like firearms or prescription medications

Someone who is experiencing such behavior or thoughts should seek immediate help from a mental health care provider. Having suicidal thoughts does not make someone flawed or weak. Mental health professionals are trained to help people understand their feelings and can improve mental-wellness and resiliency – don’t be afraid to ask for help.

If you would like to learn more about SACK, please contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness at 866-459-7225. Or visit www.simpleacts.org for additional information.

August Marks Family Fun Month

Each and every year, Family Fun Month is celebrated throughout the entire month of August. It’s the perfect opportunity for many families to enjoy each other company, while engaging in fun-filled activities.

Fortunately, summer is a perfect time of the year where you can partake in several fun activities with your entire family. Family Fun Month is a wonderful time to take advantage of enjoying your families company, while bonding over whatever activity you all choose to partake in. To help you out, I’ve compiled a list so you can get an idea of what sort of fun you can have with your family this summer!

  1. Order pizza and watch a movie in your backyard.
  2. Take a trip to the beach and collect sea shells.
  3. Take a day trip to the zoo to learn about the animals.
  4. Go on a camping trip to a new and exciting place.
  5.  Learn about stargazing and then try to identify as many constellations as you can.
  6. Pretend to be pirates for a day. Dress up, plan a treasure hunt and talk like a pirate.
  7. Throw a backyard luau with family and friends.
  8. Have a themed karaoke night.
  9. Cook a delicious meal together.
  10. Bake cookies to make ice cream sandwiches.
  11. Have a little picnic at your local state park.
  12. Take a family bike ride.
  13. Go hiking in your local national forest.
  14. Have a water balloon fight.
  15. Take a family vacation to somewhere new.
  16. Have a talent show night.
  17. Take a fishing trip.
  18. Enjoy a backyard campfire and tell ghost stories.
  19. Build a fort in your backyard.
  20. Volunteer at an animal shelter or nature center.

There’s plenty of ways to enjoy Family Fun Month, so don’t let this summer slip by without spending some fun filled quality time with your family. You can create a bucket list out of a few of these ideas, and even add a few of your very own as well. Make this one of the most memorable summers, so your children remember it their entire lifetime!

We here at Simple Acts of Care and Kindness want both you and your entire family to make the most of your summer! To learn more about Simple Acts of Care and Kindness, contact us at 866-459-7225 today. Or visit www.simpleacts.org to learn more about the S.A.C.K. foundation. 

What To Do If Your Child is Being Bullied

It’s extremely important that you talk to your children about bullying. Explain to your child what bullying is and tell him or her that it is never okay to be a bully. Not only can bullying make a child’s daily life very difficult, but it can also affect them down the road in life.

If your child is being bullied, there are a few things you as a parent can do about the situation, starting with telling him or her that it is not their fault. If your child approached you about the bullying go on to praise him or her and assure your child that you will help.  The following includes what action you should take if you child is being bullied:

Provide them with comfort and advice. Unfortunately, we can’t put a stop to bullying as immediately as we would like, but we can provide our children with tips for avoiding such harassment. If your child is being cyber bullied, you can walk them through the steps of privacy settings or discuss staying off the internet for a while to avoid the bully. Teach your child how to stay calm when responding to the bully, as reacting may encourage the bully more. Some experts have said to remove the bully’s incentives. For example, if your child’s lunch money is being stolen, try packing them a lunch instead. There is no shame is taking the high road. You should remind your children that if your advice does happen to fail, they are in no way at fault or responsible for being bullied.

Contact your child’s school. After talking with your child about the bullying situation, you should contact your child’s school. Though your child may be able to keep things to themselves, adult intervention is a necessary step in bringing the bullying to an end. Be sure to discuss the situation with your child’s teacher or principal, and make it clear that you want immediate efforts taken on their end. Also, make sure to familiarize yourself with your school’s bullying code and any relevant state laws. If you feel that your child may potentially be in danger, you may also want to contact local legal authorities. Before you approach anyone, make sure that you know the bully’s name and the specific instances when the bullying occurred.

You, as a parent, should listen calmly and carefully if your child does approach you about being bullied, meaning you shouldn’t overreact. Yelling or crying may intimidate your child, and possibly stop them from communicating in the future. There’s no doubt it’s an emotional experience discovering that your child is being bullied, however your child’s comfort should come first.

Take your child seriously and avoid laughing the situation off, or again, they may cut communication in the future. Your goal should be to show your child you care and understand the challenges of being bullied. Assure that you will stop the bully together as a team.

If you would like to learn more about bullying and what you can do to prevent it, contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness at 866-459-7225. Or visit www.simpleacts.org for additional information regarding bullying.

Four Common Types Of Bullying

There are several types of bullying that both children and adults can experience, though some can be more obvious than others. Nevertheless, every form of bullying should be taken serious. While schools are trying to do the best they can do to deal with bullying, parents are still the key to teaching their children how to prevent and stop it altogether. To help identify different types of bullying, we here at Simple Acts of Care and Kindness have complied a list of the four most common types of bullying, which include the following:

Physical Bullying- This type of bullying involves hitting, kicking, pinching, pushing and tripping, or stealing or damaging personal property. Physical bullying can cause both short term and long term damage. Many children won’t tell their parents when it occurs, so keep an eye out for possible warn signs such as unexplained bruises, cuts or scratches, missing or damaged clothes, or frequent complaints of stomach aches or headaches.

Verbal Bullying- Verbal bullying involves name calling, insults, teasing, threats or homophobic or racist remarks. While verbal bullying can start out harmless, it can mount to levels that start affecting the individual target. Some signs of verbal bullying include things such as being withdrawn, becoming moody or a change in appetite.

Social Bullying- Social bullying, referred to as overt bullying, is often hard to recognize and can be carried out behind the target back. It’s often done to harm someone’s social status and/or to cause humiliation. Signs of this type of bullying include shifting towards being alone, mood changes and becoming withdrawn from a group of friends. Examples of this type of social bullying include:

  • Lying and spreading rumors
  • Rudely mimicking someone
  • Playing nasty tricks to embarrass and humiliate
  • Negative facial or physical gestures
  • Encouraging others to exclude someone
  • Damaging someone’s social acceptance or reputation

Cyber Bullying- This certain type of bullying can be overt and covert bullying behavior. The bully would use digital technologies, including hardware like computers and smartphones, and software such as social media, texts, websites and other online platforms. Cyber can happen both in public or private and sometimes only the target and the bully know it’s occurring. Signs of cyber bulling may involve your child, after being on their phone or social media sites, more and becoming sad or anxious afterward. Cyber bullying includes:

  • Abusive or mean text messages or posts, images or videos
  • Purposely excluding others online
  • Posting nasty gossip or rumors online
  • Imitating people online or using their log-in to hurt them

If your child does approach you about being bullied or someone else being bullied, be sure to be supportive, praise them for the courage letting you know, and calmly gather information about the situation at hand. Always take action when it comes to bullying, especially if it becomes persistent or severe, by contacting your child’s teacher or principal to help monitor the situation until it stops completely.

If you’d like to learn about how you can put an end to bullying, contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness at 866-459-7225. Or visit www.simpleacts.org for additional information regarding the different types bullying.

5 Reasons You Should Be Kind

It certainly seems that we live in an unkind world. I mean, just turn on the news or take a look at your social media feed. I often ponder if there are so many bad, depressing stories, why do media and social media choose to focus on them? Either way, you should still want to encourage yourself and other to focus on the positive aspects of life.

You can choose being kind and caring in an unkind world. There are many things, people and circumstances that can try to tear you down, shake you and break you. However, it’s your choice not to let them. You have the power to keep positive and move forward. Don’t allow others to prevent you from spreading kindness. There are many reasons for you to be kind, some of which include the following:

Being kind improves happiness. Not only does being kind make others happier, it can lead to inner happiness as well. There was a study that asked volunteers to preform five acts of kindness every day for 10 weeks. After the 10 weeks were up, they found that the volunteers were 25% happier than a control group. You don’t need to change someone’s entire life to be kind. Small acts of kindness are just as meaningful for the one receiving them. You can pay someone a compliment, hold a door open for someone or help a friend with a task.

Kind people are healthier and live longer. Research has long shown that people with positive emotions and attitudes may live longer and healthier lives. Several studies suggest that acts of kindness and the emotions they produce, such as happiness and contentment, may reduce stress, lower blood pressure and improve sleep. Research has also revealed that the hormone oxytocin, which is a hormone that is released when your bond, plays a powerful role throughout the entire cardiovascular system. Kindness and bonding go hand in hand.

Kindness is quite contagious. Of course, one of the most obvious benefits of being kind is that you’re making others feel good. By making other people feel good, you’ll inspire them to want to “pay it forward”. When you perform an act of kindness, people around you typically take notice and your kind actions create a ripple effect.

Kindness doesn’t cost money. Being kind is something we can all engage in, anytime and anywhere. Being kind is a choice you make and it doesn’t cost a cent. Unfortunately, not all people realize it, but every second of your life, you have the choice be kind to others.

Kindness makes a difference in the world. People are usually kind to one another in attempt to make someone’s day better, and I assure the act of kindness does indeed make a difference. For example, caring and nurturing environments in schools makes children and youth more likely to excel. The same applies to work environments.

Don’t let anything or anyone stop you from performing random acts of kindness. Kindness has a positive effect on all areas of our lives. At the end of the day, kindness always prevails.

If you would like to help spread kindness throughout your community, contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness at 866-459-7225 today. Or visit www.simpleacts.org to learn more about Simple Acts of Care and Kindness.

 

4 Ways to Encourage Kindness in Kids

Nearly every single parent has probably said, “play nice, please” or “be kind to your bother”.  And I’m sure that most parents would agree that they want to raise kind and caring children. But is being kind something that can be taught?

Yes, however, most of the teaching is by example.

It’s our job to be great role models to better mold a kinder generation, as kindness isn’t taught, but rather learned. Verbally telling someone to be a kind and caring can only go so far, and with children words typically go in one ear and out the other.

The following list includes four ways to encourage kindness in kids:

  1. Walk the walk. Children understand the concept of kindness through daily interaction with their families. The way speak to others and your children even when tired are how they learn how to treat other people. So be sure to be the person you’d like you’d like your child to be.
  2. Talk the talk. Encourage your child with kind language. It’s been said that learning empathy and language go hand-in-hand. Kindness is essentially having the ability to take another person’s perspective and then altering your language and actions accordingly. When talking to children of a young age, make sure to speak positively and know how to word things in such a way that don’t demean another person.
  3. Reward big acts of kindness. It’s important to take notice of the “uncommon acts of kindness”, such as when your child builds a lemonade stand for a good cause or they go out of their way to help another person. However, you shouldn’t reward your children every day for everyday helpfulness, like taking out the trash or playing nice. That everyday kindness should be expected of them.
  4. Take them outside their comfort zone to teach empathy. If children haven’t learned compassion and generosity by the time they are 18, it’s very unlikely that they’ll learn kindness in a lecture hall. Young people should interact with people of all backgrounds, to learn how to “put the shoe on the other foot.” Take them out of their comfort zone to encourage personal growth for empathy.

Kindness should never be taken for granted. Teach your children how others should be treated. As the saying goes “treat others how you want to be treated”. If you would like to help spread kindness throughout your schools, contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness (S.A.C.K.) at 866-459-7225 today. Or visit www.simpleacts.org to learn more about the S.A.C.K. foundation.