World Kindness Youth Conference (W.K.Y.C.) Celebrates 9 Years! | Corona, CA

simple acts of care and kindness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simple Acts of Care and Kindness kicked off its annual World Kindness Youth Conference again this year at Crossroads Christian Church.  This two-day event gets bigger and better each year and the singers, speakers and sensitivity camp exhibits were amazing!

A huge “Thank you” to all of our 4th graders and teachers who participated in the event as well as all of our volunteers who make this event happen.  We couldn’t do it without you.

The W.K.Y.C. was first held in 2004 and uses seminars and activities to help students learn the many areas of life into which care and kindness can be inserted. Seminars and discussion groups dealing with bullying and other relationship topics fill the morning. After lunch, students visit exhibitors who have come with messages about care and kindness for themselves (staying health with good food and physical activity), their family (anger management, safety, emergency procedures at home), their community (programs for the developmentally disabled, helping keep parks clean and green…), and their world (recycling, planting trees…).

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness today at 866-459-7225 or visit our website for more information.

Simple Acts of Care and Kindness proudly serves Norco, Riverside, Lake Elsinore, San Bernardino, Eastvale and surrounding areas.

 

Who is Geno Segers? | Corona, CA

Photo from IMDB.com

Geno Segers is an actor and voice-artist possessing an active background in many fields of entertainment and athletics. He was born in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and with his athletic prowess, participated in football, wrestling and track during his high school and college years. While attending school at Western Carolina University (WCU), the 6’4″ Geno played football which later led to him playing for the American National Rugby League. During this time playing in rugby, Geno later moved to New Zealand where he played for Richmond Rovers Rugby League team. Geno Segers‘ first taste of the entertainment field began with a suggestion by a friend to try voice-work. Possessing a naturally-rich bass quality, Geno first auditioned for voice-ads for a radio station in New Zealand. His voice gained him attention enough to attract an agent’s ear. This led to Segers being cast in the role of Mufasa in an Australian stage production of “The Lion King”.

Photo from sitcomsonline.com

With an intimidating voice and appearance, Geno is best known and identified with the comedic series “Pair of Kings” (2010) aired on the Disney Channel. On the series, Geno plays the role of Mason Makoola, the fearsome father of Mikayla Makoola [played by Kelsey Chow]. His character, although tough and menacing at times, is perhaps one of the more comedic characters on the show and is described as a tritagonist to the two protagonist characters King Brady [Mitchel Musso] and King Boomer [Larramie Doc Shaw]. Aside from his role on “Pair of Kings”, Geno serves as a co-host for the Disney XD’s UK-aired game show Fort Boyard: Ultimate Challenge.

Received a request to send in a reel for the Disney channel series “Pair of Kings”. They wanted someone who “spoke like James Earl Jones but looked like [Dwayne Johnson] The Rock.” He landed the role of Mason Makoola, the guard of twin kings Brady and Boomer.
Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness today at 866-459-7225 or visit our website for more information.
Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness proudly serves Norco, Riverside, Lake Elsinore, San Bernardino, Eastvale and surrounding areas.

Special Announcement from Geno Segers | Corona, CA

Hi, this is Geno Segers from Disney’s “Pair of Kings“.  I’d like to invite you to attend a great event in Corona with your family on Tues. Oct. 8th.  Not only will the Ochoa Boyz & I be singing, but I will also have some special words to share with you.  And . . . we’re also going to be honoring some Home Town Heroes.

So, here are the details:

  • The date is Oct. 8th at Crossroads Christian Church.
  • At 5:00 Miguel’s, Chick-Fil-A and McDonalds will be available to make your dinner purchase easy.
  • There will be a Silent Auction with some great items such as Disneyland tickets, Knotts Berry Farm tickets, Dinner for 4 at Eagle Glen Country Club & many more, including several great drawing gifts.
  • The program will start at 6:30.  I’m so excited to be singing with the World Kindness Youth Choir and can’t wait to meet you & your family.

Oct. 8th, food & silent auction at 5:00 and the program starting at 6:30.  Admission is FREE.

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness today at 866-459-7225 or visit our website for more information.

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness proudly serves Norco, Riverside, Lake Elsinore, San Bernardino, Eastvale and surrounding areas.

 

Bullying Facts and Solutions | Corona, CA

Despite all of the media attention that has been given to the mostly tragic consequences of bullying, you simply need to scan the comments sections in on-line articles regarding bullying to sadly see what percentage of adults stay in the dark while not really understanding the negative impact that bullying has on such a large amount of kids on a daily basis.

Below are some of the facts and statistics that we’ve found that make the most important impact on how adults and parents begin to understand bullying as an issue, not just in their community, but also throughout the entire country as well.

Bullying Facts and Statistics

  • 160,000 children within the United States stay home each day due to bullying situations.
  • Eighty-three percent of bullying incidents receive no intervention and continue to happen.
  • Those who bully are four times as likely to participate in criminal behavior in adulthood and frequently develop self-destructive thoughts
  • There are four types of bullying: physical, verbal, cyber,  and social. Male bullying a lot of the time consists of verbal and physical abuse, whereas female bullying a lot of the time involves verbal abuse, cyber, and social bullying by spreading of rumors.
  • Only half of educators have received coaching on the way to handle bullying incidents.  Not teaching educators a way to handle bullying is like not training doctors to treat the flu!
  • Children are additional more likely to receive verbal assaults targeting their appearances and behaviors instead of race or spiritual beliefs.  In several cases, bullies felt that the victim was responsible for these behaviors or appearances.
  • A study by the National School Board Administration reported that 33.1% of the Middle and High School students that participated in the study agreed or strongly agreed that teachers and adults can stop bullying.  This implies that 2/3 of those students don’t seem to be assured that they will get the help they need in bullying situations from their teachers or other adults in power.
  • In 2005, approximately 1 out of 10 internet users aged 10-17 had been the victim of cyber bullying and “on-line harassment”.  Half of victims that were bullied off-line and on-line by one single individual reported being extremely troubled by the incidents.

“If there are no heroes to save you, Then you be the hero”
― Quoted from a Japanese Comic book

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness today at 866-459-7225 or visit our website for more information.

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness proudly serves Norco, Riverside, Lake Elsinore, San Bernardino, Eastvale and surrounding areas.

Mean Girl Bullying…. What adults can do! | Corona, CA

Do schools and teachers pick up on this happening?

Often parents and teachers dismiss the mean girl behavior as part of being a girl.  They often say, “It’s what girls do,” or “Girls will be girls.” Often with younger elementary school girls, parents are not as tuned in to the situation to watch out for this type of behavior because it just seems that the girls are too young for it to be happening to them. But if you talk to teachers, they will tell you they see it on a daily basis.

Many Anti-bullying programs focus only on managing physical aggression, so the issue of mean girls fall outside the scope of the majority of programs. Boys often tend to be more physical, so when there is a fight on the playground with one child being aggressive towards another, there is cause for concern. The school does not want a child physically injured.

Most Anti-bullying programs don’t look at friendship issues, but for girls, that’s where the aggression usually happens.

What can you do when the bully is the girl’s best friend?

If safety is issue and your child is in danger or endangering someone else, get professional help.

Preparing girls for what they might face with a new classroom full of girls is a great idea. Every year there are different  in the classroom. Here are some tips that can help:

  • Start by building strong connections at home. You want to be understanding and a good listener. But that doesn’t mean asking questions that can be leading or suggest that she has been wronged.
  • Validate the range of emotions she is experiencing are valid. Help your daughter understand that all emotions, both positive and negative, are normal.  Remind her that bad emotions don’t make her a bad girl. Try telling her things like, “I understand  how angry you are about what happened. It hurts our feelings when friends are mean.” By allowing your her anger or irritation to play out will help her calm down quicker than if you just play down the situation.
  • Avoid problem-solving for her. You want your daughter to learn how to handle herself in these situations and in life. Be there for her and don’t just tell her what to do. Helping her work through what is going on by asking her questions like, “I understand that your friends are telling everyone that you’re poor and you shop at the thrift store. Why do you think she is she doing that?” Help her understand what is going on in the situation.
  • Try role play to work through the problem. Help by practicing with your daughter her responses to bullying but asking questions like, “Why are you worried about my clothes? If you really are my friend, then why would you be so worried about this?” Help your daughter hold her ground with her own strong but not aggressive statements. Or, if your family has had enough of the situation, a better idea is to start developing new friendships and avoid that “friend.”
  • Work with teachers and school staff. At this young age, girls look up to their teachers and other adults at the school. If they see an exclusion situation happening, sometimes these adults can offer your daughter an opportunity to join him or her for lunch or a special activity to increase her “social value.”

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness today at 866-459-7225 or visit our website for more information.

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness proudly serves Norco, Riverside, Lake Elsinore, San Bernardino, Eastvale and surrounding areas.

The “Mean Girl” bully… No longer just in Middle School | Corona, CA

Kids are starting to heading back to school and one important situation to cover is “mean girlbullying. Typically we think of it as a middle-school issue, but it’s now happening at younger ages. Below we will talk about the problem of young mean girls and how parents can prepare their daughters for more difficult social situations they may face before the school year begins.

What does young mean girl bullying really look like in the first- or second-grade?

Typically it can be cruel words, the spreading of rumors, and systematic teasing. Some parents have said it even started in kindergarten. A study done at SUNY Buffalo in New York concluded that some girls understand these tactics as young as preschool.

Official the term for this is called “relational aggression.” As girls get older and move into third grade, they get more sophisticated and cliques really begin to form. Additionally during this time, you see actions with intent to hurt. Although in kindergarten through second-grade girls, these actions may not be intend to hurt; the girls involved are trying establish their place on the social ladder and often don’t realize that what they are doing is  actually causing pain to others.

One of the most difficult things about this for the younger girls involved is that it can be their best friend who is also their bully. These back and forth friendships can be destructive for the girl who doesn’t know from one day to the next if her friend will play with her, or round up other girls and start a club where she is the only girl that is not allowed to join. Research has shown that the collection of the mean-girl experiences over time can significantly impact a girl’s ability to learn.

See next weeks article on what adults can do to help.

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness today at 866-459-7225 or visit our website for more information.

Contact Simple Acts of Care and Kindness proudly serves Norco, Riverside, Lake Elsinore, San Bernardino, Eastvale and surrounding areas.

e-Waste Event…. A Success! | Corona, CA

Thank you to everyone that came out to our e-Waste Event on Saturday.  With your help, we were able to fill 6 large palettes with your e-Waste!  It is with your support that we are able to continue our mission to eradicate Bullying from our schools and from the daily lives of our children!

But without your continued support we cannot make a difference. If you were unable to attend the event, you can STILL donate your items to help the children of Riverside County fight Bullying!  Bring your items Monday through Friday from 8:00am – 5:00 pm to:

840 E. Parkridge Ave, Suite 106, Corona, CA  92879

If you are a company with a large amount of items to donate, we can arrange a pickup at your location at no charge to you!  Please contact us to make this happen and give you more space in your office at 951-737-8558.

As follows are the items we can and cannot accept-

Approved Display eWaste including intact Computer Monitor, LCD, Plasma, CRT TV’s, LED or Projection TV (functioning or non-functioning).

Approved Computer eWaste includes: functioning and/or non-functioning Computer Towers, Computer Servers, Tablet PC’s, Netbooks and Switches.

Approved Breakage includes copiers, printers, fax machines, scanners, and other office/computer equipment not mentioned above.

UNAPPROVED eWaste includes but is not limited to florescent light bulbs, alkaline batteries, liquid waste, oils, paints. Etc.  We also do not accept Full Size Refrigerators, Washing Machines or Dryers.

eWaste Donation Day- This SATURDAY!! | Corona, CA

Come and help S.A.C.K. at their upcoming eWaste recycling event!  Bring your items on Saturday July 13, 2013 from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm to the following location:

Corona High School
1140 Tenth Street
Corona, CA  92882

By donating your computers or electronics to S.A.C.K. you help us encourage acts of kindness among young people and adults, and to generate and administer funds for the S.A.C.K. movement as well as for the annual World Kindness Youth Conference.

Approved Display eWaste including intact Computer Monitor, LCD, Plasma, CRT TV’s, LED or Projection TV (functioning or non-functioning).

Approved Computer eWaste includes: functioning and/or non-functioning Computer Towers, Computer Servers, Tablet PC’s, Netbooks and Switches.

Approved Breakage includes copiers, printers, fax machines, scanners, and other office/computer equipment not mentioned above.

UNAPPROVED eWaste includes but is not limited to florescent light bulbs, alkaline batteries, liquid waste, oils, paints. Etc.  We also do not accept Full Size Refrigerators, Washing Machines or Dryers.

If you have items to donate and cannot bring them to the special event date, please come by our specially designated office to drop the items off:

Up & Running Computer Solutions
840 E. Parkridge Avenue
Suite 106
Corona, CA  92879

(951) 737-8558

Monday through Friday from 8:00 – 5:00 to drop off any of the approved items listed above.

Discriminatory harassment and bullying: a definitional sticky wicket? | Corona, CA

Bullying in the news

Part of the confusion arises from the word’s increased popularity and the public’s tendency (fueled by the media) to apply it too broadly. This is what Emily Bazelon, senior Slate legal editor and author of Sticks and Stones, argued in a New York Times op-ed in March: “(The word) is being overused — expanding, accordion-like to encompass both appalling violence or harassment and a few mean words.   The misdiagnosis of bullying is making the real but limited problem seem impossible to solve. If every act of aggression counts as bullying, how can we stop it?”

In a later column in Pyschology Today (March 31), Bazelon drew a distinction between the overused definition of “bullying,” on the one hand, and the consistently clear definition of “discriminatory harassment” under federal discrimination laws. She urged care in “distinguishing discriminatory harassment from other kinds of bullying. In the case of discriminatory harassment (based on race, disability, sex, etc.), the law is clear and so are the definitions. The federal Department of Education wrote a letter to schools reminding them of their obligations in 2010, and it sets out clear guidelines for shielding students from bullying that’s based on what’s really discrimination.”

So, according to Bazelon, the definition of bullying has been abused, but the definition of discriminatory harassment is clear and always has been. This requires some deconstruction.

The standard definition of “bullying” among educators and psychologists comes not from the law but from a Swedish psychologist, Dan Olweus, according to Bazelon. While researching aggression among youth during the 1960s, Olweus identified a whole range of cruel behaviors but found a particularly wounding form of aggression he labeled “bullying.” This behavior had three basic elements: verbal or physical aggression; repetition over time; and a power differential.

“A onetime episode of meanness or violence could be bad in the moment, but it was the repetition and the power imbalance that were most often associated with lasting, scarring impact. Bullying, as Olweus defined it, was the behavior that constituted real abuse in the eyes of the children themselves: a serious rupture in their lives with potentially devastating consequences,” Bazelon wrote.

California law does not contain a definition of prohibited “bullying” conduct, except to the extent that it outlines school findings necessary for the most severe disciplinary consequences, as stated in Education Code section 48900(r). In order to suspend or recommend expulsion, a school must find “bullying” that fits these requirements:

“Severe or pervasive physical or verbal acts or conduct, including communications made in writing or by means of an electronic act … directed toward one or more pupils that has or can be reasonably predicted to have the effect of one or more of the following:

(A) Placing a reasonable pupil or pupils in fear of harm to that pupil’s or those pupils’ person or property.
(B) Causing a reasonable pupil to experience a substantially detrimental effect on his or her physical or mental health.
(C) Causing a reasonable pupil to experience substantial interference with his or her academic performance.
(D) Causing a reasonable pupil to experience substantial interference with his or her ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities or privileges provided by a school.”

Federal law does not directly address bullying. However, both California and federal law prohibit “harassment” of students based on legally protected attributes (race, sex, disability, etc.). “Harassment” is defined as conduct that creates a “hostile environment” that limits students from participating or benefiting from school activities or services and can include conduct that might also be considered “bullying” under the Olweus or other definitions.

California Education Code section 48900.4 provides that the school may suspend or recommend for expulsion students in grades 4 to 12 when the school has determined that “the pupil has intentionally engaged in harassment, threats or intimidation, directed against school district personnel or pupils, that is sufficiently severe or pervasive to have the actual and reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting classwork, creating substantial disorder, and invading the rights of either school personnel or pupils by creating an intimidating or hostile educational environment.”

While “harassment” conduct may overlap with what is known as “bullying,” it is not the same as bullying. The concept of bullying is based on a psychological construct designed to identify the most emotionally harmful behavior; by contrast, harassment is a legal construct designed to protect certain students from discrimination. Harassment, which may include bullying, may also include conduct outside the standard definition of bullying; for example, harassment under federal law does not need to be directed at a specific target, is not necessarily motivated by intent to harm and is not always repeated.

The preceding is a recent story posted on the website Palo Alto Online dated June 14,  2013.  Use this link to read the story in its entirety.

For more information about how you can help call us at 866-459-7225 or visit our website at http://simpleacts.org

S.A.C.K. also proudly serves Norco, Corona, Lake Elsinore, San Bernardino, Eastvale, and surrounding areas.

Donate your computers or electronics and help S.A.C.K.! | Corona, CA

Come and help S.A.C.K. at their upcoming eWaste recycling event!  Bring your items on Saturday July 13, 2013 from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm to the following location:

Corona High School
1140 Tenth Street
Corona, CA  92882

By donating your computers or electronics to S.A.C.K. you help us encourage acts of kindness among young people and adults, and to generate and administer funds for the S.A.C.K. movement as well as for the annual World Kindness Youth Conference.

Approved Display eWaste including intact Computer Monitor, LCD, Plasma, CRT TV’s, LED or Projection TV (functioning or non-functioning).

Approved Computer eWaste includes: functioning and/or non-functioning Computer Towers, Computer Servers, Tablet PC’s, Netbooks and Switches.

Approved Breakage includes copiers, printers, fax machines, scanners, and other office/computer equipment not mentioned above.

UNAPPROVED eWaste includes but is not limited to florescent light bulbs, alkaline batteries, liquid waste, oils, paints. Etc.  We also do not accept Full Size Refrigerators, Washing Machines or Dryers.

If you have items to donate and cannot bring them to the special event date, please come by our specially designated office to drop the items off.

Up & Running Computer Solutions
840 E. Parkridge Avenue
Suite 106
Corona, CA  92879

(951) 737-8558

Monday through Friday from 8:00 – 5:00 to drop off any of the approved items listed above.